Tuesday, January 08, 2008

New Grip Tips:

This is a continuation of the post from 11/17/07:

If you run to the truck for it, you'll find out it was under the carts the whole time.

Paper tape does not stick well in humidity.

Neither does gaffer's tape.

When blocking out a shot, the DP will always make one end of the track stop in a puddle.

Juicers are like cops, you don't really appreciate them until you need one.

(This is an old one) The difference between a flare and a highlight? $10,000 a day.

Mambo-combo wheels are for sissies. (That should stir 'em up).

Doorways are the most likely place for extras/directors/PA's/or actors to gather.

"Crew has the set!" rarely results in any meaningful help.

"Mini-move" is a term coined by Satan to make UPM's feel better.

The coffee out of the catering truck will remove rust from c-stands.

You cannot get "sweet tea" in California. (Ok, it's important to me).

Every now and then, the guy who delivers the crane will think he automatically gets to operate it.

The seat holes on a dolly are (inexplicably) not "junior" sized.

Load carts smart wheels last.

Hacky-Sack at lunch is not a constructive utilization of your time. Go clean the dolly track.

You can't fully close in the wheels on a Peewee with the pneumatics on.

A sandbag touching the ground while on a stand is useless.

Combo stands outside.

If you need to lay track, and the set is still full of extras and actors and the AD's still aren't clearing them though you've asked twice, have a seat, preferably in full view of the ADs. Light up a smoke or break out a bag of chips. This will usually have the desired effect.

That's all for now. I'll save some for later.

2 comments:

azurgrip said...

I smell a T-Shirt coming on!

Michael Taylor said...

I'm not sure if Mambo wheels are for sissies -- but they're sure as hell damned near useless. As are Mambos, for that matter -- most of the time. When you really need one, nothing else will do -- but Jesus H. Christ are those fuckers heavy...

As for sandbags -- I can't even count the number of times I've had to remind young grips (the kids with two years in the Biz who Know Everything) about placing the bag on the high leg, as far from the ground as possible. Sometimes they listen, sometimes they don't. All I can do is try...