Wednesday, February 17, 2010

Road to Perdition

The late Conrad Hall delivers a Master Class on How It's Done. My friends, if you've never seen it, rent it. I saw it on the big screen, but you can get a taste. A gorgeously photographed movie the way they used to do it. They don't make them like this anymore. Shout out to Dolly Grip Mike Schwake. Gorgeous work my friend. This is the movie we all wished we'd worked on.

7 comments:

Azurgrip said...

Amazing what you can find on late night TV. I keep wanting to see this movie, but neglect to rent it. I've seen bits and pieces since they've run it a bunch of times of TV, but want to sit and watch it all the way through sans commercials.

D said...

It's strangely a forgotten movie. But if you want to see, literally, how it's done, rent it. I'm catching it on network tv late night, but it's really an unbelievably beautiful movie I own the DVD but forgot about it.

D said...

Anytime you work on some HD piece of crap, remember, they wish they could shoot like this.

Tommy said...

I absolutely love this film. Conrad Hall is the one DP I wish I could have met at some point in my life. An acquaintance of mine had the pleasure of working with him on Road to Perdition and said he's everything you imagine he would be. Kind, understanding, willing to teach and a true master of his craft. We need more like him.

Did any of you guys ever get to work with him?

GHB said...

I'm good friends with the Gaffer and the BB Electric that did this picture and they are the most proud of the hard work they put into that film. I agree that it is not only one of the best looking movies ever photographed, but it is also one of the best films ever made. I don't know why it did so bad in the theaters other than the fact that people are just not into great stories and great dramas and great acting anymore. They just want to see stupid shit explode in 3-D. How sad. Anyway...I am on-board with you and think this is a classic of American cinema and from what everyone has ever told me, Conrad Hall was a genuine and sincere man who always had time to convey the art of the craft. This business sorely misses guys like him. True filmmakers.

Clayton said...

The film exemplifies pure beauty in every aspect of filmmaking. It's one of my favorites, yet no one seems to have seen it! Always one of my top recommendations.

Larry Vigus said...

I was lucky to have worked with "Connie" a couple of times and I rate him as not only one of the most talented DPs ever, but also one of the best film professionals to work with.